The Best and Worst U.S. States for Living with Cerebral Palsy

Nationwide Cerebral Palsy Resource Network

How does your state stack up when it comes to providing services to assist people with Cerebral Palsy as they seek a fulfilling, productive, healthy and independent life? A recent report from United Cerebral Palsy ranks each state according to a number of factors regarding how the jurisdictions serve residents with Cerebral Palsy.

The report, titled “The Case for Inclusion 2016” provides a snapshot assessment of how the states are doing when it comes to four key outcomes:

states

Analyzing data from multiple sources, the
research team assigned rankings to each of the
50 states and the District of Columbia.
According to the analysis, here is how they rank:

Highest-Ranking States by Category

Although they may not have been ranked at the top overall, some states outperformed all others in each of the five categories in the report. The top-ranking states by category were:

Highest-Ranking States by Category

Lowest-Ranking States by Category

Other states performed particularly poorly in certain areas. The lowest-ranking states in each category were:

Lowest-Ranking States by Category

Factors Considered in Ranking the States

United Cerebral Palsy looked at a number of factors to calculate the rankings for the states. Some of the key metrics used in the study include:

  • Types of housing for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • How many residents live in housing facilities (the fewer the better)
  • Percentage of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who live in large state institutions (the fewer the better)
  • Percentage of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who live in a family home (the more the better)
  • Number of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who report feeling lonely less than half the time
  • Number of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who had a recent dental appointment
  • Number of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who report not feeling scared in their home
  • Number of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who report having relationships with people other than staff and family
  • Percentage of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are employed
  • Vocational rehabilitation rate (number of participants who find a job)
  • Number of hours worked per participant in vocational rehabilitation
  • Number of participants in vocational rehabilitation who kept a job for at least a year
  • Percentage of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who receive home and community-based services
  • Average growth of waiting list for residential and home and community-based services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
  • Number of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities served per 100,000 population

DISCLAIMER: WHEN ‘FEWER THE BETTER’ IS USED, THIS MEANS MORE ATTENTION IS AVAILABLE AND PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OVER-CROWDING ARE NOT AS PREVALENT

Changes in Rankings

Since the organization began compiling the report in 2007, some states have made significant improvements, while others have fallen in the rankings. Here are some of the biggest movers during the past decade:

MOST IMPROVED

2007-2016

 2016 Ranking2007 RankingChange
1. District of Columbia7th49th42
2. Missouri8th41th33
3. Ohio16th48th32
4. Maryland10th33rd23
5. Kentucky19th40th21
6. Indiana20th37th17
7. South Dakota9th26th17

GREATEST DECLINE

2007-2016

 2016 Ranking2007 RankingChange
1. Idaho16th29th-17
2. West Virginia39th25th-17
3. Connecticut37th22th-21
4. Massachusetts22nd6th-22
5. Wyoming36th19th-26
6. New Mexico38th18th-27
7. Alaska23rd2nd-28
8. Montana29th8th-29

 

 

 

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